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Kentucky Straight Bourbon: Blanton’s, George T. Stagg, Makers Mark, Woodford Reserve, Old Grand Dad and Gentleman Jack

bourbon tasting pic 300x177 Kentucky Straight Bourbon: Blanton’s, George T. Stagg, Makers Mark, Woodford Reserve, Old Grand Dad and Gentleman JackBy Shepard Ritzen

I’ve always thought I liked bourbon, but never really knew what I preferred. To help with this crushing dilemma, I gathered some friends together and hosted a blind bourbon tasting. This way we could crown our favorites without any preconceived notions or brand typecasts. Eleven friends came over to share in the scientific experiment. The tasting resulted in some surprises, some grimaces, some indifference, and luckily, no sickness.
 

We proceeded as follows: Each person set out six different cups/glasses for the bourbons. I poured one ounce of each product, known only by number, into the cups. From here, people were instructed to examine each bourbon’s color, nose/smell, entry taste, and finish. With all six poured at the same time, the guests could go back and forth between the samples, comparing and contrasting the qualities. And everyone was encouraged to cleanse their palates between samples with crackers and water.

I’d like to take a moment to point out a few tricks about a whiskey tasting. Especially since people probably have more experience with wine tastings, there are a few things that differ.

1. Participants are encouraged to add a small bit of bottled water (anywhere from a few drops to a 1:1 ratio) to taste bourbon. Water mutes the alcoholic bite, while releasing the unique aspects.

2. People are encouraged to hold the glass in their hand. Heat from the hand warms the alcohol, further releasing the bourbon’s distinct traits.

Once we had a favorable amount of time to compare the samples, I revealed the brands one at a time. We discussed the bourbon’s interesting and historical points as well as expert descriptions of their characteristics.

The six bourbons poured were, in order:

blantons 290x300 Kentucky Straight Bourbon: Blanton’s, George T. Stagg, Makers Mark, Woodford Reserve, Old Grand Dad and Gentleman Jack1. Woodford Reserve Distiller’s Select

2. Old Grand Dad Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

3. Blanton’s Single Barrel Bourbon

4. George T Stagg Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey Uncut/Unfiltered 2009

5. Maker’s Mark Kentucky Straight Handmade Bourbon Whisky

6. Gentleman Jack Rare Tennessee Whiskey

Here is how they fared:

Woodford: Per the majority of everyone’s critiques, this was a middle of the road bourbon (but my particular favorite). I like Woodford for its distinct deepness in the sweet woody and smoky flavors. It is not bad bourbon, but to most, it did not stand out. Our panel of tasters noted that it had a nose of cinnamon, allspice, and carrot cake. They judged the initial taste to be pleasant and sweet; fruity and even orange. Later the taste became that of nutmeg, cereal, apple, caramel-like and toffee. Some reviewers noted it had a slight burn, but that it was pleasant over all.

Woodford is the official bourbon for the Kentucky Derby and Breeders Cup. It is crafted by methods started by Dr. Jim Crow back in the early 1800’s. The distillery is now owned by Brown-Forman, who also owns Jack Daniels. They use limestone water, corn, rye, and malted barley in the sour mash process. It is then triple distilled in imported Scottish copper pot stills, unique in the US. For the maturing process, it is stored in new, charred white oak barrels, specifically crafted for Woodford Reserve, which are then housed in a limestone warehouse.

Old Grand Dad: Many people were surprised at this bourbon’s identity. It ranked higher than some of the others for many people, and yet, it was the cheapie of the group. I could tell that it was not very “expensive” bourbon, as I had trouble getting it down straight (in a bad way). Still, it’s a great mixer. People commented that it had odors of kerosene, a weak alcohol sting, medicinal and yet, a bit of caramel. Beginning with tastes ranging from oat bran, pretzel, raisins to paint thinner and bland alcohol, it evolved into bland, fruity and lime flavors, with either a harsh, long alcohol finish or a smooth finish that revealed itself over time.

Old Grand Dad is an old bourbon, started by the grand-son of bourbon pioneer Basil Hayden Sr., (whose image graces the front of the bottle, and who has his own bourbon line named after him). At one point it was made at the Old Crow distilleries. But since 1987, it has been in the Jim Beam family. It was one of the only liquors allowed production during prohibition, as it was used as a “medicinal whiskey” for the sick, blind, and lame.
Blanton’s: This was the winner declared by most, which makes sense, since “more expensive” is stereotypically linked to better bourbon. This was the second most expensive. I myself was not taken away by this one, although I did like the finish. People discovered sweet smells of banana, vanilla, and butterscotch. The taste began with a hard, deep entry, as well as apricots and smoky flavors. Changing into more fruity elements, some guests were reminded of prunes and cake batter. It finished mellow and creamy with sweet fruit notes and a “proper burn.”

Blanton’s is known as the first single barrel bourbon to be marketed commercially in 1984. But the bourbon’s namesake stems back to 1897, where Col. Albert Blanton started his life working in and around bourbon. He worked his way up to run his own distillery, which he did though times that were tough for other companies. With a government permit, his was one of only four distilleries to make whiskey during prohibition. He was also able to kept production rolling through World War 2, when distilleries were required to focus on straight alcohol for the military. The bourbon is stored in an iron clad warehouse, and is the furthest warehouse away from the river on his grounds. This allows maximum summer heat to warm and age the bourbon before it gets hit with cooling moisture from the river. And in the winter they utilize steam heat to continually age the bourbon. It is now produced by Buffalo Trace, which also makes Ancient Age, Eagle Rare, George T Stagg, Van Winkle and many other brands.

George T Stagg: This was the special bourbon of the batch. In my research, I discovered that this is rather difficult bourbon to get. I was naïve when I got this treat, because I simply said to the local liquor store proprietor that I was hosting a bourbon tasting, and wanted something a little extra special, possibly expensive for the event. He went into the back and pulled this out from a “special” box. He assured me it was good, and we’d like it.

Woodford Reserve1 Kentucky Straight Bourbon: Blanton’s, George T. Stagg, Makers Mark, Woodford Reserve, Old Grand Dad and Gentleman Jack When I got home, I saw on the label that this was uncut, unfiltered bourbon right from barrel to bottle, resulting in a 141.4 proof. I’ve had Bookers before, and at 128 proof, that made my esophagus melt. So I was excited to put this up against the other bourbons blindly. The initial reaction from the smell was head-jerking, eye-watering burn. It became an event, waiting for each individual to reach #4. When someone got there, they uttered a “Whoa” or an *expletive* from across the room and we all laughed. I thought it smelled like Super Elastic Bubble Plastic (remember that stuff?). Others said it smelled of fiery turpentine, oakey, fruity, and like vanilla ice cream. But once we added water to it, the face melting traits subsided, and the true nature of the bourbon took effect. It went from a varnish, nail polish remover taste, to a smoky sweet entry with wooden, fruit, caramel, and cherry tastes and then a cinnamon, woody finish. Most judged this bourbon to be harsh, like a sickening fire. Or, simply put, “the bourbon that wants to kill all my children.”

Stagg is very rare indeed. They produce less than 600 cases of it once a year, every year, since 2002 (they did 3 batches in 2005). This makes it like a wine, where each vintage is unique with different characteristics (and different proofs, ranging from 129 [2004] to 144.8 [2007]). Thanks to the high alcohol content, and flammability, this bourbon is considered a Hazmat, and cannot be taken on a plane. Because of its dangerous status, the earlier, high content bourbons were nicknamed Hazmats I-IV. The company Buffalo Trace makes this bourbon (see Blanton’s too), and they age it for 15-17 years in charred oak barrels. Then all the barrels of one vintage (around 89 barrels) are mixed together and bottled right away. The high alcohol content is also attributed to the way it is aged. Most scotches (for example) are stored and aged in humid environments, where, because of the moisture, less water evaporates. In the case of the Buffalo Trace Distilleries, the aging process occurs in drier conditions. Thus, more water evaporates, leaving the alcohol behind, raising the proof.

Maker’s Mark: Oddly enough, this is the bourbon that confused the most people. I say “oddly” because Maker’s Mark is, for my dollar, the definition of a middle of the road, average bourbon. It’s the one bourbon whose complexities are like a blank canvas, useful to judge other bourbons against. But one taster adamantly said he never liked Maker’s Mark, while sipping and enjoying this #5 the most out of the bunch. Personally, I did not write anything down because there was noting distinct I could say about Maker’s Mark (also this sample followed the 141 Stagg, which I now see, might have been poor arrangement). The smell was described as sweet, apple spice and medicinal by different guests. The entry and palate were described as lovely & light, sweet, caramelly, Jewish apple cake and over-all; adequate. And it finished with a sickening or syrupy taste depending, as always, who you asked.

Maker’s Mark is owned by Fortune Brands, who also own Jim Beam. The one most unique thing about Maker’s Mark is that it is not made with rye. The creator, Bill Samuels Sr., was a sixth generation distiller, and in 1953, he abandoned his family’s 170 yr old recipe. He did not want to waste years fermenting different experimental grain formulas, so instead he decided to bake different breads with different grain proportions. The best tasting bread recipe would be his new bourbon. The winning combination was that of barley and red winter wheat. So by 1958, we had our first bottle of Maker’s Mark.

Maker’s Mark has become a highly recognizable logo and image when one thinks of bourbon. That has everything to do with Mr. Samuels’s wife, Marjorie. She came up with the name, bottle design, trademark wax coated bottle neck with running tendrils, and even the font for the label. Now, more recently, Maker’s Mark has been extending its visibility, with its own brand of restaurants/nightclubs. The first Maker’s Mark Bourbon House & Lounge opened in 2004, in Louisville, KY (the menu was designed by Chef Al Paris, from Philly’s Zanzibar Blue). In 2008 and 2009, two more opened in Kansas City, MO and at the Indiana Live Casino (just outside of Indianapolis) respectively.

Gentleman Jack: This is the one whiskey (not a bourbon, but close enough for us) that benefited from being left to the blind taste test. There is definitely a preconceived notion of Jack (and Jim Beam) as being a cheap mass-produced, thus inferior, whiskey. Even though the brand we tried is deemed “Rare” the stigma is not easily broken. So it came as a great surprise to many that #6 was a Jack Daniels brand, especially since it finished as the #2 favorite (average agreement). When I tasted this, I noticed that it was lighter tasting, and the most “edible” of all the whiskies. People also noted that it has a weaker scent, but identified fruity characteristics like poached pear and a hint of citrus. The taste was sugary sweet, fruity and spicy with more of that citrus taste; perhaps, even a bit scotch-like. And the finish was clean.

In 1988, Jack Daniels introduced this refine recipe of higher end whiskey to cater to a slightly snobbier drinker. One friend said that this whiskey is basically what Jack used to be like when he was younger. He went on to argue that Jack Daniels changed their flagship brand into a lower quality version, and then repackaged the original recipe as this “higher shelf” brand. Jack Daniels Rare is filtered twice (once before and once after it’s aged) through ten feet of hard sugar maple charcoal, rather than the one time it does to the regular brand. It is this filtering that sets it apart as a whiskey, and not bourbon (bourbons are not filtered between distillation and barrel aging). The whiskey is aged in brand new, charred American white oak barrels that they specifically make themselves. The barrels are used once and only once.

With all the bourbons (and whiskey) revealed, we shared a final discussion about the prices per bottle and additional anecdotes. We came back to the bar, and topped off our glasses with our favorites, drinking them how ever we like them. As an added bonus, everyone enjoyed whiskey-pared hors d’oeuvres such as cheeses, apples, sausage, chocolates, veggies and “whiskey bark” (toasted marshmallows stuck to a bed of crushed almonds). Being a conservationist, I rounded up all the unfinished samples and recklessly poured them into an empty decanter, which became the now infamous “home-blend:” great for a whiskey sour, an old fashioned or a dare to drink straight.  And for some odd reason, that’s really all I can remember about the evening…

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Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve: A Review

Woodford Reserve Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve: A ReviewThe Redbreast 12 Year:

The Readbreast 12 year Irish whiskey is absolutely an outstanding whiskey.  It’s one of the best whiskeys we’ve ever had period.  Redbreast 12 Year is perhaps the smoothest Irish whiskey we’ve ever on the planet.  With a scotch like complexity and a bit of sweetness, it had the perfect whiskey flavor but not too much that it dominates the drink.  The bite is absolutely flawless.  Redbreast 12 Year is the only aged pure pot still whiskey in the world and is matured in sherry and bourbon casks.  

The Elijah Craig 18 Year:

A very strong single barrel bourbon, the Elijah Craig 12 year, has a great bite and a lot of flavor for bourbon.  One knows right away that you are drinking bourbon.  The Elijah Craig 18 year is the oldest single barrel bourbon in the world.  After the 18 years almost two thirds of the barrel has evaporated.  Not only are aged whiskeys, cognacs and rums more expensive to store for that period of time, but after so long, there is so little of the actual drink left to consume that a fine aged whiskey has to come with a serious price tag.  If you’re a fan of bourbon, the Elijah Craig 18 year is an excellent choice.             

Woodford Reserve:

The Woodfor Reserve is a handcrafted 90.4 proof Kentucky Straight Bourbon.  I’ve had this 5 other times and liked it, but now it showed true character.  With a great bourbon flavor, it’s much more subtle than the Elijah Craig.  It’s a great balance for a bourbon whiskey with a little complexity and rather smooth. 

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The Makers Mark 562 Bourbon Seasoned Cigar: A Review

makers mark cigars 224x300 The Makers Mark 562 Bourbon Seasoned Cigar:  A Review By Matt Goldstein

Wrapper: Sumatra

Filler: Dominican Republic

Binder:  Connecticut

Size:  Torpedo

Strength:  Medium Body

 The 562 Torpedo Cigar by Maker’s Mark is a bourbon seasoned small batch hand made cigar from the Dominican Republic.  The long leaf tobacco is grown with Cuban seeds in the Dominican, and aromatically seasoned with Maker’s Mark bourbon.  The cigar is then sealed in a glass tube with the Makers Mark signature red wax.  The seal is air tight so there is no need for a humidor. 

The first 1/3 of the Makers Mark 562 Torpedo Cigar is smooth with slightly sweet smoke and a sweet flavorsome wrapper.  The middle of the cigar brings a lot more flavor and is slightly dry with hints of wood.  The 562 Torpedo smokes well and is a great cigar. 

Check outCAO Gold , Gurkha Symphony , Tony Borhani’s Bahia Trinidad

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The Whiskey Goldmine: Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve, Powers 12, Wild Turky Rare Breed, Makers Mark, Jack Daniels & Bulleit Bourbon

whiskeys 1111 300x174 The Whiskey Goldmine: Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve, Powers 12, Wild Turky Rare Breed, Makers Mark, Jack Daniels & Bulleit BourbonFeaturing Redbreast 12 Year, Elijah Craig 18 Year, Woodford Reserve, Powers 12 Year, Wild Turkey Rare Breed, Makers Mark, Jack Daniels and Bulleit Bourbon 

By Matt Goldstein 

After many futile attempts at trying to come up with a more manly way to say whiskey “tasting” we just said forget it and got lit.  It was the Whiskey Goldmine.  We had 8 different whiskeys from bourbon to Irish whiskey and just plain old regular whiskey.  The goldmine did not disappoint. 

The career bourbon drinker Jimmy Barlieb, myself and special guest appearance by the one and only track star champion and softball phenom, Steve Tuteur poured about a shot each whiskey sipped them in a completely random order, sometimes with ice, sometimes without.  We also did a few shots hear and there depending on the mood and type of whiskey. 

2988 Redbreas 300x300 The Whiskey Goldmine: Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve, Powers 12, Wild Turky Rare Breed, Makers Mark, Jack Daniels & Bulleit BourbonThe Redbreast 12 Year:

Redbreast Irish whiskey was absolutely outstanding and by far the best whiskey of the evening.  Redbreast 12 Year is perhaps the smoothest Irish whiskey we’ve ever tasted.  With a scotch like complexity and a bit of sweetness, it had the perfect whiskey flavor but not too much that it dominated the entire drink.  The bite was absolutely flawless.  Redbreast 12 Year is the only aged pure pot still whiskey in the world and is matured in sherry and bourbon casks.  

elijah craig 18 161x300 The Whiskey Goldmine: Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve, Powers 12, Wild Turky Rare Breed, Makers Mark, Jack Daniels & Bulleit BourbonThe Elijah Craig 18 Year:

The Elijah Craig single barrel bourbon was very strong.  It had a great bite and a lot of flavor for bourbon.  You knew right away that you were drinking bourbon.  The Elijah Craig 18 year is the oldest single sarrel bourbon in the world.  After the 18 years almost two thirds of the barrel has evaporated.  Not only are aged whiskeys, cognacs and rums more expensive to store for that period of time, but after so long, there is so little of the actual drink left to consume that a fine aged whiskey has to come with a serious price tag.  If you’re a fan of bourbon, the Elijah Craig 18 year is an excellent choice.         

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Woodford Reserve:

Woodford Reserve is a handcrafted 90.4 proof Kentucky Straight Bourbon.  I’ve had this 4 other times and liked it, but this time it really grew on me.  Although it has the bourbon flavor, it’s much more subtle than the Elijah Craig.  It’s a great balance for a bourbon whiskey with a little complexity and rather smooth. 

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Powers Gold Label 12 Year Special Reserve:

Powers 12 is a blended Irish whiskey.  It doesn’t have as much flavor as the regular Powers Gold Label but it’s certainly smooth enough for a straight sipping whiskey.  Powers Special Reserve 12 years aged is crafted from the finest Irish Barley and water, triple distilled and matured in American Oak casks.  Powers Gold Label is the best selling whiskey in Ireland.  Yes, it crushes Jameson in sales actually.          

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wild turkey rarebreed 300x300 The Whiskey Goldmine: Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve, Powers 12, Wild Turky Rare Breed, Makers Mark, Jack Daniels & Bulleit BourbonWild Turkey Rare Breed:

Rare Breed is a Kentucky Straight Bourbon.  What a badass shot of whiskey!  WOW!  We love it!  Rare Breed is barrel proof at 108.6.  According to bourbonenthusiast.com, Wild Turkey Rare Breed bourbon is a unique blend of Wild Turkey 6 year, 8 year and 12 year-old stocks. 

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Bulleit Bourbon:

Bulleit is distilled and aged in small batches and stored in a single-story warehouse.  It’s a 90 proof bourbon whiskey which is “formulated by mingling, not blending,” two and sometimes three different batches.  Bulleit is very strong and dry whiskey with a heavy of bourbon flavor.  With a high content of rye, the Bulleit is called the frontier whiskey.  It wasn’t one of my favorites of the night but our writer Jon Rosenberg seems to love it.  Jon described Bulleit as follows, “There’s that glorious aftertaste: the second after the drink goes down there’s this lingering something that I have only ever found in Bulleit.  It’s the sort of special flavor that can bring to mind old memories in a flash…”

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Jack Daniels Old Number 7:

Jack Daniels Tennessee whiskey speaks for itself.  By far one of our favorite whiskey shots in the world, Jack Daniels is aged in white oak barrels characterized by the famous charcoal mellow.  It’s made very much like bourbon, but since it’s not from Kentucky, technically it’s just a whiskey.  But who cares?  It’s not where you’re from; it’s where you’re at.  Old Number 7 is more of a shot whiskey than a sipping whiskey but Gentlemen Jack is a perfect sipping whiskey.  A review of the single barrel is coming very soon as well. 

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The Makers Mark:

The Makers Mark was not actually opened on this night because we were pretty lit from all the other whiskeys, but we’ve had it plenty of times so we can tell you all about it.  Makers Mark is a Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey.  It’s a single barrel small batch whiskey.  Maker’s Mark is a solid shot drinking whiskey and definitely a better sipping than Jack.

jonny cash 300x266 The Whiskey Goldmine: Redbreast 12, Elijah Craig 18, Woodford Reserve, Powers 12, Wild Turky Rare Breed, Makers Mark, Jack Daniels & Bulleit BourbonThe Whiskey Armageddon:  To compliment the whiskey, we drank Guinness and smoked couple Oliva Seri V, and CAO Brazilia cigars.  The official song of the night was When the Man Comes Around by Johnny Cash.  What’s better than a biblical song about Armageddon to help you savor the whiskey?  When the Johnny Cash song came on all hell broke loose.  I had no choice but to punch Jimmy right in his mouth.  He shouldn’t have dropped his guard; that was pretty stupid.  His lip was bleeding.  Oops.  He then tackled me and beat the crap out of me.  It was awesome.  If there was a whiskey goldmine, I’m pretty sure we found it. 

“Will you partake in that last offered cup, or disappear into the potter’s ground?  When the man comes around.”

Steve and myself ranked the whiskeys as follows:

1.  Redbreast 12 Year

2.  Wild Turkey Rare Breed

3.  Woodford Reserve

4.  Elijah Craig 18 Years

5.  Powers Gold Label 12 Year

 6.  Bulleit Bourbon

 7.  Makers Mark

8.  Jack Daniels

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Bulleit Bourbon Frontier Whiskey: A Review

bulleit bourbon 1 297x300 Bulleit Bourbon Frontier Whiskey: A Review

by Jonathan Rosenberg

I’m relatively new to drinking whiskey like a beverage, as opposed to as a succession of quickly-imbibed stepping stones on a path towards drunkenness.  In December 2007, a friend gifted me a bottle of Knob Creek when I announced the start of a six-month campaign to be a writer.  A real honest -to-god paid writer.  It was a gamble (and it ended up not paying off, not then anyway) – but this friend got me this bourbon because bourbon, he said, “is a writer’s drink.”  I liked that.  It fit snugly into my Romantic notions of writerhood:  The aloof poet, the unconscious traveler, the dude passed out back stage at a Guided By Voices show.  Mere brew would not do!  (I honestly did not mean for that last sentence to rhyme Johnny Cochran style.)

Knob Creek:

The Knob Creek was tasty; it whetted my appetite for sure.  I pushed through the burn (for some reason I used to be fond of announcing, “butterscotch bullet!” with each sip, as a way to mask my whiskey-virgin whiny-girledness.)  By the end of the bottle I knew that I had discovered a new thing to spend $25 on at least once a month.  And I knew I liked bourbon specifically – its sweetness, its copper color.  But I didn’t really know where to go next.  The local Bevmo (a wonderland of alcoholic-awesomeness for my East Coast buddies who are unaware…) had just shelves and shelves of this stuff.  I had heard of Jim Beam, and Jack Daniels (okay, technically not a bourbon), and never particularly liked them.  But this Knob Creek was different.  It was complex, soulful.  Were their other treasures waiting to be unearthed?

The first bourbon I discovered entirely on my own, separate from any friend’s recommendation, was Bulleit.  I was immediately attracted to the bottle- a sort of canteen-looking thing, like a relic from a bygone time.  The subheading “Frontier Whiskey” furthered this Old West image- I liked their marketing department already.  And then there was that color, that glorious orange, like a glass of Oktoberfest beer.  Bulleit is certainly the most orange of any bourbon I’ve experienced.  And something about that, its suggestion of Autumnal warmth perhaps, really appeals to me.  I remember loving this bourbon right off the bat, and it quickly became my go-to.  Particularly since Trader Joe’s, at least in LA, sells it for $19.99.  Always.

So what’s it taste like?  Don’t fret dear reader, I’ve got the bottle in front of me this very moment.  Let’s explore, shall we?  The smell is of cinnamon and honey and pumpkin, sweet things, and I want to say prune, but then again I typically want to say prune.  The taste is unique, to my tongue, for a bourbon.  There’s almost a cotton-candy sweetness at first bite- followed by the vaguest hint of fire jolly rancher.  The burn is spicy but not too harsh, like good buffalo wings.  And then there’s that glorious aftertaste: the second after the drink goes down there’s this lingering something that I have only ever found in Bulleit.  It’s the sort of special flavor that can bring to mind old memories in a flash, like Proust and his Madeleine, or the guy from Blues Traveler and his chili.

 Now, I’ve since had better bourbons with more interesting flavors, liquid symphonies and blissful maelstroms, but I will always have a soft spot for this, my first discovery and still one of my favorites.  If there was a rating system on Whiskey Goldmine, I’d give it 9 out of 10 Whiskey Goldmine Units (WGUs)!

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Worlds Best Whiskey Shots: Powers, Jameson, Jack Daniels, Tullamore Dew, Crown Royal, Bushmills and more

Powers Whiskey Worlds Best Whiskey Shots: Powers, Jameson, Jack Daniels, Tullamore Dew, Crown Royal, Bushmills and morePowers Reigns Supreme Over the Best Whiskey Shots in the World!

By Matt Goldstein

1.  Powers Irish Whiskey Gold Label

Established in 1791 in Dublin, Powers is now the most popular whiskey in Ireland.  Powers is also the most popular whiskey in Philadelphia’s infamous Chestnut Hill Bocce Club, home to many Irish hoodlums and 1 lonely Jew, me.

2. Jameson Irish Whiskey, Triple Distilled

Established in 1780 in Dublin, Jameson now sells 30 million bottles annually and is by far the best selling Irish Whiskey in the world.

3. Jack Daniels Tennessee Whiskey, Old Number 7 Brand

This Lynchburg Tennessee native is made with a signature Charcoal Mellow and aged in hand crafted barrels.  Established in 1875, Jack Daniels has a net income of $121 million. 

4. Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey, Triple Distilled

Founded in Tullamore, Offaly County in the heart of Ireland in 1822, this “legendary” Irish Whiskey is famous for it’s copper pot still blend.  Tullamore Dew is the 2nd best selling Irish Whiskey in the world and is also growing the fastest. 

5. Crown Royal Canadian Whiskey

Created in 1939, the Segrams president decided to make a special whiskey blend for    the arrival of King George IV and Queen Elizabeth, hence the royal blue, velvet bag.  Crown Royal always performs well in international competitions and is the best selling Canadian whiskey in the United States.   

6. Bushmills Irish Whiskey, triple distilled

7. Makers Mark Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

8. Jim Beam Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, Sour Mash

9. Old Grand Dad Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

10. Wild Turkey Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

 

Random Whiskey Shots:

I bet you are asking yourself how I came up with such an iron clad, scientifically factual top 10 list that cannot be changed, ever!  Well, It was years of practice my friend.  I bet you are also asking yourself how you can join the prestigious members only Bocce Club.  Well, I doubt you can afford the very pricey $40 a year membership fee that comes with about 80 shots of free Powers annually.  The Bocce Club is an elite force of Irish hoodlums and former Italian Mafioso, and I’m the only Jew allowed in, although I have been kicked out and I think suspended or something, but that’s all in the past.  You are probably also annoyed that I stopped those amazing little synopsis paragraphs after Crown Royal.  The truth is that I have to go to the gym before my wife starts yelling at me to clean the house, which will never happen by the way.  I have to burn off those three shots of Powers from yesterdays Bocce outing that were somewhere between the 12 beers tailgating at a Phillies game in 100 degree weather.  Ugh!  Never again.  But the whiskeys listed 6-10 are certainly deserving in their own right.  Jim Beam actually produces Baker’s, Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s and Knobb Creek.  So if you thought Jim Beam was cheap, middle shelf, think again.  Jim Beam is probably the finest Bourbon Whiskey distiller in the world!  Also, this list is about doing shots, not sipping, so stop being a whiney little girl.

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